chuseok

Chuseok 추석

What is Chuseok?

Chuseok ("choo-suhk") is one of the biggest holidays in Korea. It is sometimes referred to as "Korean Thanksgiving" because it is a special time for family, friends, and food.

What is Chuseok?

Chuseok ("choo-suhk") is one of the biggest holidays in Korea. It is sometimes called "Korean Thanksgiving" because it is a special time for family, friends and food.

When is it?

September 10, 2022

This year, Chuseok is 10 days earlier than last year (September 10, 2022).

For how much longer?

3 days!

From September 9th to 12th.

There will be a big Korean national holiday at the beginning of October. Chuseok , Korean Thanksgiving Day, is one of the largest and most important holidays in Korea. In 2022, Chuseok Day falls on September 9th. Since the day before and the day after are also part of the holiday

Traditions

The Story of the Moon Hare

The folklore of the mid-autumn harvest

Did you know that mid-autumn Thanksgiving holidays around the world are attributed to the moon in folklore? When you look at the full moon in Korea, you may see an image of a rabbit making rice cakes. But what is that rabbit doing up there?

This legend comes from Buddhist traditions and its retelling differs slightly between countries. The story as it relates to Chuseok goes like this: A fox, a monkey and a rabbit are devoted students of Buddhism. One day they allow their faith to be tested by the Emperor of Heaven. The emperor disguises himself as a beggar and asks the animals for something to eat. Each animal gathers food on its own, with the fox bringing back fish, the monkey bringing back fruit, and the rabbit bringing back some grass. Because of the rabbit's weak sacrifice, it decides to set the grass on fire and jump in to offer itself to the beggar. The emperor was so moved that he named the rabbit guardian of the moon.

There are important symbols in the image of the Moon Rabbit - fertility, longevity and harvest. The rabbit is a sign of fertility that complements Chuseok's celebration of bountiful harvests. In the Korean retelling, the rabbit is said to be standing under a gyesu tree. The tree is a sign of longevity due to the medicinal uses of the cinnamon in its bark. The rice cakes it makes are a staple of the Korean harvest and symbolize an appreciation of the mid-autumn harvest, along with good wishes and dreams.

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